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Law School Hiring, Both Entry-Level and Lateral:
Initial round-ups of faculty hiring at U.S. law schools came online today. Legal Theory Blog has the scoop on entry-level hires, and Concurring Opinions has posted the initial reports of law school faculty lateral moves. Some of the info at CO has appeared at Leiter's Law School Reports over the last few months, but some of it is new.
Medis:
Having followed what Solum calls "The JD Tournament" for a few years, it always amazes me how relatively consistent the list looks from year to year.
3.2.2006 12:56pm
Roger Alford (mail):
My survey of new and lateral international law faculty hires is available at Opinio Juris here.
3.2.2006 1:50pm
Jeek:
Just curious... is there "overproduction" of potential law professors, as there is in much of the humanities, or is it "about right"? About how many applicants are there for each position?
3.2.2006 1:55pm
Medis:
Jeek,

As I recall, there are many more applicants seeking positions through the AALS process every year than there are open positions. But I don't have hard numbers available offhand, and I don't know if anyone has ever tried to quantify how much hiring goes on outside the AALS process.

Of course, that does not necessarily imply there is an "overproduction" in the humanities sense. A JD, of course, has many other professional uses, and this may be just one option among many for the AALS applicants. In contrast, humanities PhDs often have limited utility if you cannot get a job as a professor.
3.2.2006 2:04pm
Justice Fuller:
Jeek,

A potential law professor is just a smart lawyer who has written a few articles. Given that, potential law professors aren't really "produced," they just apply. And if they don't get a job, they just stick with their preexisting job in legal practice.
3.2.2006 2:04pm
Phil (mail):
I think that Justice Fuller is correct with one(extremely minor) revision. I think that a non-trivial number of faculty do not mind going back and forth, particularly for significant opportunities. I was briefly a member of a law faculty, accepted a government appointment, and would have returned to teaching if asked. I wasn't so I accepted a (regular) government job. Another member of the same faculty was asked back and I believe that he remains in academia, though not at the same school. Moreover, if one has tenure, the opportunities expand dramatically. (I believe that a few years back there was a law prof who obtained a leave of absence to serve as the Dep AG of a state.) So, in a sense, the number of potential law profs is practically unlimited because the risks of pursuing a position are minimal.
3.2.2006 3:13pm