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Some Dartmouth Stuff:

First, the Dartmouth Review republishes a delightful late-Nineteenth Century essay by former English Professor H. H. Horne on "The Dartmouth Man," distinguishing the characteristics of said fellow from his colleagues at Harvard. Republished on several occasions through the years, and quite obviously overgeneralized and dated in places, I enjoy rereading for its reflections on Dartmouth's somewhat unique character and the way in which geography and philosophy interact to shape the nature of institutions. I am also always struck by Horne's description of the leveling effect of the fierce New Hampshire winters in tending to break down differences of class and pretentions among Dartmouth students and reinforcing the virtues of practicality and usefulness.

And for those who may be interested, the Dartmouth Review will be celebrating its 25th Anniversary with a New York City gala next week (April 21). I wasn't a Review staffer at Dartmouth and it doesn't look like I will be able to attend the gala, but I pass along the info to those who might be interested. Peter Robinson has the details on what promises to be an enjoyable evening.

Scotty:
Why do you post this nonsense on here? None of the other bloggers post tripe about their undergrads.
4.11.2006 1:53pm
Aaron:
He forgot about the leveling effects of massive amounts of brewed malted beverages...
4.11.2006 1:56pm
Aaron:
Scotty--it isn't tripe. You have to understand that there simply is something special about the Ivy league, some mystical force more alluring, more inspiring, more enchanting than any other place.

Except Nebraska. There's just no place like it.
4.11.2006 1:59pm
trock:
Why do you post this nonsense on here? None of the other bloggers post tripe about their undergrads.

Maybe because (A) no other posters are trustees at their alma maters and (b) Dartmouth alums seem to share a stronger connection than alums from other undergrad institutions. I'm not even an alum, but I can see why he posts and I enjoy reading them.
4.11.2006 2:01pm
Aaron:
Oh, and UVA. Wisconsin. Michigan. Notre Dame. Texas. ROLL TIDE! War Eagle!

God, I miss college football!
4.11.2006 2:02pm
Aaron:
Trock:

Actually, I would venture to say that the alumni of the service academies, and Princeton rival Dartmouth's devotion (maybe UVA, but I'm not sure). Yale, BC, Meechigan and Notre Dame are on the next rung down.

Harvard alums who love Mother Harvard REALLY love Mother Harvard--everyone else is kind of ambivalent. I would submit that there is a higher proportion of devotees in the above schools than at Fair Harvard.
4.11.2006 2:07pm
Zywicki (mail):
Aaron:
I love the Bob Ufer "Meechigan" reference.
4.11.2006 3:05pm
Ryan Minor:
I agree with Aaron -- Hahvahd does not seem to generate the same kind of devotion among alums as other great universities.

Very fascinating reprint, however -- I am glad to see that Dartmouth alumi are still interested in maintaining the honor and integrity of their institution, and in remembering what makes their alma mater special.

One thing to note: there is probably not a similar article from the period from a Harvard professor comparing Harvard's students to "the Dartmouth Man." :-)
4.11.2006 3:49pm
Hoosier:
Notre Dame the "Next rung down"? On what planet?

We Domers are ferocious, rabid, insane. Cut me and I bleed blue and gold.

I can't speak re: BC or Michigan, since I've never heard of them. Are they regional teachers colleges or something?
4.11.2006 4:24pm
Silicon Valley Jim:
One thing to note: there is probably not a similar article from the period from a Harvard professor comparing Harvard's students to "the Dartmouth Man." :-)

Yep, for the same reasons that Atlantans and San Franciscans can't stop telling you how sophisticated the residents of their cities are, while Londoners never mention it.
4.11.2006 4:37pm
Aaron:
Harvard (never "Hahvahd", please that's just vulgar) and the Yankees are always targets to shoot for, not grubby little strivers trying to knock an icon from the pedestal.

(Am I one of those super dedicated alums referenced earlier? You bet your bippy!)

And lay off BC, Hoosier. Sheesh, 1993 was a long time ago. Remember that if it weren't for us, your most famous icon would be the "GOAAAAAAL" Jesus.
4.11.2006 5:40pm
Aaron:
And while I love Harvard, and respect our country cousins to the north, we all take a backseat to the dedicated cadets and midshipmen of our service academies.
4.11.2006 5:42pm
Ryan Minor:
Aaron, do not forget that there are Harvard (and Dartmouth, and Princeton...) graduates serving in our armed forces as well. Not only can they fight, but they can also read Latin and deconstruct Houellebecq with the best of them.
4.11.2006 9:44pm
Hoosier:
Aaron--

Sorry. I just can't support BC. It's that old rivalry: Catholics vs. Jesuits.

But I'm concerned. Do Harvard grads think that "GOAAAAAL" is a football term?

On the other hand, it's understandable. The Crimson (or Mauve. Or whatever.) don't score much, so I'm sure one tends to forget what to shout.

As for the Yankees: I'm a Cubs fan. So me attacking the Yanks would be pathetic. Since the Yankees were founded, they've won the World Series one time in four. Since the Yankees were founded, the Cubs have never won.

Well, at least I wasn't educated by the Jesuits.
4.11.2006 10:30pm
Hoosier:
Ryan--

Do students at the Ivies really read Latin? I thought they were too busy with their "Jungian Perspectives in Film" classes.

How old *is* your copy of "Peterson's Guide"?
4.11.2006 10:33pm
Ryan Minor:
At least until the early 90s, the percentage of Harvard undergraduates with some background in Latin was higher than the general college population in the U.S. (and probably not too far off from the percentages at other Ivies, esp. those drawing heavily from prep schools). Knowing Latin was (and still is) a very handy skill in certain fields of study, and is required for several graduate programs.

Solum potestis prohibere ignes silvarum.
--"Only you can prevent forest fires."
4.11.2006 11:48pm
Aaron:
Hoosier,

The touchdown. The forward pass. The gridiron. The current dimensions of the modern footbal field. All innovations created by Harvard.

Also, it's "Magenta", not "Mauve" that was the precursor to the current "Crimson"

Fight Fiercely!
4.13.2006 6:46pm