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Rabkin to George Mason:

I'm very pleased to announce that Professor Jeremy Rabkin of Cornell University, an authority on international law (and the dangers of the imposition of international law on the United States), and author of, most recently, Law Without Nations? Why Constitutional Government Requires Sovereign States (Princeton University Press, 2005), has agreed to join the George Mason University School of Law faculty this Fall. To know Jeremy is to be extremely impressed with him.

Jeremy will join Eric Claeys, another great lateral hire, and a lineup of new assistant professors not as yet completely set.

Kent Scheidegger (mail) (www):
Congrats to Jeremy and George Mason. Does this leave Cornell without any persons of sense? Is affirmative action required?
3.12.2007 4:06pm
Cornellian (mail):
Cornell has lots of great profs, I'll have you know.
3.12.2007 4:09pm
JohnAnnArbor (www):
I wonder if he's any relation to Eric Rabkin, English professor at U. of Michigan....
3.12.2007 4:29pm
Another Cornellian:
It's a sad day for Cornell. Prof. Rabkin will be missed on the Hill. I guess the timing makes sense now that his son is finishing up with his CU education.

Cornell may have lots of great profs, but it also has very little political diversity. It's a disservice to the students to only ever hear ideas from one side.
3.12.2007 4:31pm
Alan Gura:
Prof. Rabkin was my adviser way back when on the hill. Definitely a loss for Cornell. Perhaps Mason can send back two economists and a power forward?
3.12.2007 5:15pm
Viscus (mail) (www):
Just what George Mason Law needs. Yet another rightwing professor. GMU Law is probably the most ideologically unbalanced law school in the country.
3.12.2007 5:30pm
Big Red Alum:
Mason continues to build a top-notch faculty.

Rabkin was my advisor at Cornell in the early 90s, and the only professor I had in four years who was not left-of-center. If GMU Law lacks balance, I assure you it's no less balanced than Cornell's entire college of Arts &Sciences.

Also, I have a passing acquaintance w/ Eric Claeys and am confident that he's another good find for GMU.
3.12.2007 7:04pm
GMUSL 3L (mail):
Viscus, Mason tries to hire more professors on the left, but for some reason, they don't seem to enjoy being in the intellectual minority. Go figure.

There are more than a few professors on the left, though I doubt it seems that way from your completely ignorant, off-campus view.

I, for one, am overjoyed that Professor Rabkin will be joining us, especially as this will undoubtedly help our rankings and I've attended a few events at which he's spoken, and found him to be very impressive.

Professor Claeys, in particular, seems to be an unusual Mason hire. We don't often get former SCOTUS clerks on the faculty, especially compared to most of the other law schools in the top tier.
3.12.2007 7:09pm
OrinKerr:
GMUSL3L writes:
Mason tries to hire more professors on the left, but for some reason, they don't seem to enjoy being in the intellectual minority. Go figure.
I wonder, is that true? Who are the liberal candidates that have received offers from GMU?
3.12.2007 8:20pm
davidbernstein (mail):
GMUSL, we don't hire USSC clerks as much as other schools, especially given our location, because we hire less on traditional credentials and more on demonstrated academic promise. We tend to think outside the box for hiring, which is how we have competing with more established schools with a lot more money. I'd say more, but I don't want to give away trade secrets.
3.12.2007 8:56pm
GMUSL 3L (mail):
Orin, what I've heard from some of the faculty and administration (as well as Hayley Reynolds of FedSoc) is that we've made offers to more liberal faculty members, but those have been near-universally turned down. I lack any first-hand knowledge of these matters.

Prof. B -- I definitely want to keep our competitive advantage. My comment about the SCOTUS clerks comes from the National Review article last year and the knowledge of the faculty's experiences (good for Professor Lund!)
3.13.2007 12:28am
Ilya Somin:
Orin, what I've heard from some of the faculty and administration (as well as Hayley Reynolds of FedSoc) is that we've made offers to more liberal faculty members, but those have been near-universally turned down.

We have indeed made offers to more liberal candidates, and those offers have (at least in recent years) generally been turned down. As a general rule, liberal applicants with credentials comparable to those of the entry level conservatives and libertarians we hire can get jobs at higher-ranked schools. It is also possible that some of them are uncomfortable about being in the intellectual minority, since this is a very unusual experience for liberals in the academic world.Several liberal faculty members who were already at GMU when I first came (2003) have since been hired away by higher-ranking and/or wealthier institutions.
3.13.2007 2:26am