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Open Thread:
We haven't had an open thread in a long time. What's on your mind?
vinnie (mail):
I"ll start.
Bring back the military draft. I think it is the best way to save this country (Yes it will screw the military but hey they can handle it. They did in the past. Pretty well in fact.) If you take city boys and country boys and ship them across country for basic training, then somewhere else for training. Assign them to bases as varied as fort Huachuca and Ft. Lewis Send them home to spread the word.

Benefits: Melting pot. You can walk in to a bar and order branch water in any state and get the same drink. We all speak the same language.
City people see some country and vice versa. They get the "Big picture", or at least exposed to it.
You get more informed voters. Nothing like the threat of getting handed a rifle and put in harms way for getting the attention of a teenager.

I don't think having more military trained citizens is a bad thing.

I am sorry if this is off topic but I think it is as off topic as asking people who advocate keeping guns out of the hands of criminal "why are the criminals not in jail?".
10.5.2008 11:53pm
Jerry F:
What I have in mind these days is, which country should conservatives go to in the event that they do not feel that they can live under an Obama regime? Leftists could, of course, go to pretty much any country in the European Union if a conservative were to win. But we conservatives don't really have anywhere to go.
10.5.2008 11:54pm
Cornellian (mail):
Why don't you have more frequent Open Thread days?
10.5.2008 11:56pm
egn (mail):
Why do cable news shows think that an appropriate way of presenting and analyzing an issue surrounding the presidential election is to put on an Obama campaign spokesman and a McCain campaign spokesman and have them spin and spout their respective talking points?

Intolerable. Sometimes I wish I lived in England; at least they appear to have a real media.
10.5.2008 11:56pm
Cornellian (mail):
Jerry F: Depends on whether you mean economic conservatives, social conservatives or some other type of conservative.
10.5.2008 11:57pm
Chris_t (mail):

Why do cable news shows think that an appropriate way of presenting and analyzing an issue surrounding the presidential election is to put on an Obama campaign spokesman and a McCain campaign spokesman and have them spin and spout their respective talking points?


What other way is there? I guess you could do the O'reilly-Barney Frank approach, which takes care of spin but doesn't really illuminate much else.
10.5.2008 11:58pm
Chris_t (mail):
Vinnie: I don't think its off-topic. Its an open thread:)
10.6.2008 12:00am
Nunzio:
What effect do the baseball playoffs have on the election. Couldn't watch the debate the other night because watching the Dodgers beat up on the Cubs. The debate seemed to get some pretty high ratings, though.

So is there any overlap between sports junkies and political junkies or are the two groups basically mutually exclusive?
10.6.2008 12:04am
Chris_t (mail):
Speaking of the draft and the societal benefits derived thereof, '300' is on HBO right now.
10.6.2008 12:04am
anon45 (mail):
Why have the sane Volokh conspirators allowed their more insane fellows to devolve into such caricatures?
10.6.2008 12:13am
subpatre (mail):
Cornellian said: "Depends on whether you mean economic conservatives, social conservatives or some other type of conservative."

OK, any of the above. Which countries?

Seriously, Jerry's question is based on the US being --at least appearing to now be-- the only nonmarxist western nation remaining; 'marxist' encompassing social socialism, economic socialism, enforced nonreligiosity, anticapitalism, and 'health' regulation.

To open his question a bit, what nation anywhere would be nearest his description? ...that allows its citizens to live as they choose?
10.6.2008 12:14am
jbn (mail):
How VC has become a lame adjunct of Fox News - just spitting out whatever the republican talking points are for the day.

Not all of the VC, of course, it seems to be 3 or 4 posters.

People were actually defending Palin's inability to name the newspapers she read and her inability to name more than 1 supreme court case. Someone said her position on global warming was "nuanced."

Just laughably silly stuff.
10.6.2008 12:14am
dssinc (mail):
I've been soberly reflecting on just how little value-add is reflected in the massive debt our nation has incurred in recent years. x trillions of dollars of debt later, and what do we have to show for it: remodeled kitchens, some SUVs and a several thousand dead soldiers?

I wouldn't feel so bad about the money we've borrowed if we had leveraged it for some meaningful long-term gain instead of flushing it down the toilet like so many empty calories.
10.6.2008 12:14am
OrinKerr:
Why have the sane Volokh conspirators allowed their more insane fellows to devolve into such caricatures?

They probably just realize I'm really stubborn and that any efforts to stop me will fail.
10.6.2008 12:21am
Jim at FSU (mail):
I heard the legal market is tightening up. Less of everything to do.

Been seeing a lot of people encountering unexpected difficulty landing jobs. Of course it doesn't help that there is a major budget crunch in FL and there is a major tightening of the amount of real estate work being done (which also diminishes the amount of environmental, etc law being practiced).
10.6.2008 12:24am
DiverDan (mail):

Why do cable news shows think that an appropriate way of presenting and analyzing an issue surrounding the presidential election is to put on an Obama campaign spokesman and a McCain campaign spokesman and have them spin and spout their respective talking points?


AMEN -- If I have to watch just one more minute of Paul Begala or Donna Brazile or James Carville, or any other "Campaign Spokesman" or "Democratic [or Republican] Strategist" trying to pass itself off as "news", I will be forced to pull buy a revolver and shoot my TV. Maybe if we ALL pull an Elvis and shoot our own Televisions we can put a stop to this farce.
10.6.2008 12:27am
js5 (mail):
my party right or wrong, eh Orin?

my thought: Ronald Reagan said that it was not he who left the Democrats, but that it was the Democrats who had left him. Thousands of jaded conservatives are saying this much about the GOP.
10.6.2008 12:27am
Chris_t (mail):
egn and Diver Dan:

What's the alternative? Is there one?

I'm geniunely curious about this.
10.6.2008 12:29am
Loophole1998 (mail):
John F - Why don't you stay here and work to fix your moribound party (assuming you are indeed a Republican--hardly a "conservative" party these days).

Nothing can take the bloat off a political party and sharpen its purpose than being in the minority.

Hopefully the resurrected Republican party of 2012 will truly be conservative (at least in the fiscal sense).
10.6.2008 12:29am
js5 (mail):
Diver Dan: why shoot a perfectly good tv? It would be prudent to sell it to an unsuspecting dolt. I haven't owned a television in four years, and I'm damn proud of it. It's such a time-waster. That, and it is bubblegum for the brain.
10.6.2008 12:30am
Lil' Geo (mail):
What's on my mind? The softening market for legal services.
10.6.2008 12:35am
therut (mail):
I am wondering on how I can set up a cash only Medical Practice and survive and not have to be part of socialized Medicine. If I can just make enough to cover the bills (about 30,000 a year) I will probably do that. Otherwise, I just do not know. Maybe become a private contract worker for a hospital and let them deal with the government. Not me. I already have enough .gov paper work that does nothing to help patients. I have another physician in my group who is interested. We are tired of the goverment intervention between us and our patients. I am also worried that when I get old and sick I will only have the option of a State controlled physician and hospital to go to. Lord I pray that is not so. I have seen such places and I do NOT want to be forced to be taken care in one. Espically if old and ill. Nightmare Situation.
10.6.2008 12:36am
Smokey:
An Economist book review. Why are these questions never investigated by an 0bama-worshiping media?:

If you find yourself believing that "we are the ones we've been waiting for", or that "this is the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow" or even, tout court, that "yes we can", the chances are that you are suffering from a severe case of Obamamania.

Tens of millions of Americans and an even larger number of Europeans have fallen victim to the syndrome, which involves a belief that a young black senator from Chicago can cure the world's ills, in part because of his race, in part because of his obvious intelligence and rhetorical skill; but in no part because of any record of achievement in the past. Fortunately, an inexpensive remedy is at hand.

It comes in the form of a new book by David Freddoso, "The Case Against Barack Obama". Unlike the authors of some of the cruder attacks on Mr Obama, Mr Freddoso works for a well-respected organisation, the online version of the National Review. Although it is a conservative publication and the author makes no secret of where his political sympathies lie, this is a well-researched, extensively footnoted work. It aims not so much to attack Mr Obama as to puncture the belief that he is in some way an extraordinary, mould-breaking politician.

The Obama that emerges from its pages is not, Mr Freddoso says, "a bad person. It's just that he's like all the rest of them. Not a reformer. Not a Messiah. Just like all the rest of them in Washington." And the author makes a fairly compelling case that this is so. The best part of the book concentrates on Mr Obama's record in Chicago, his home town and the place from which he was elected to the Illinois state Senate in 1996, before moving to the United States Senate in 2004. The book lays out in detail how this period began in a way that should shock some of Mr Obama's supporters: he won the Democratic nomination for his Illinois seat by getting a team of lawyers to throw all the other candidates off the ballot on various technicalities. One of those he threw off was a veteran black politician, a woman who helped him get started in politics in the first place.

If Mr Obama really were the miracle-working, aisle-jumping, consensus-seeking new breed of politician his spin-doctors make him out to be, you would expect to see the evidence in these eight years. But there isn't very much. Instead, as Mr Freddoso rather depressingly finds, Mr Obama spent the whole period without any visible sign of rocking the Democratic boat.

He was a staunch backer of Richard Daley, who as mayor failed to stem the corruption that has made Chicago one of America's most notorious cities. Nor did he lift a finger against John Stroger and his son Todd, who succeeded his father as president of Cook County's Board of Commissioners shortly before Stroger senior died last January. Cook County, where Chicago is located, has been extensively criticised for corrupt practices by a federally appointed judge, Julia Nowicki.

The full extent of Mr Obama's close links with two toxic Chicago associates, a radical black preacher, Jeremiah Wright, and a crooked property developer, Antoin Rezko, is also laid out in detail. The Chicago section is probably the best part of the book, though the story continues: once he got to Washington, DC, Mr Obama's record of voting with his party became one of the most solid in the capital. Mr Freddoso notes that he did little or nothing to help with some of the great bipartisan efforts of recent years, notably on immigration reform or in a complex battle over judicial nominations.

Sometimes, however, Mr Freddoso lets his own partisan nature run away with him. It strikes the reader as odd to make an issue out of the Obamas' comfortable income, when everyone knows that John McCain and Hillary Clinton both have family fortunes in excess of $100m. On the whole, though, Mr Freddoso raises legitimate points. And he ends with a question Obamamaniacs should ask themselves more often: "Do you hope that Barack Obama will change politics if he becomes president? On what grounds?"

The Case Against Barack Obama: The Unlikely Rise and Unexamined Agenda of the Media's Favorite Candidate.


[source]
10.6.2008 12:36am
Johnny Canuck (mail):
JerryF:What I have in mind these days is, which country should conservatives go to in the event that they do not feel that they can live under an Obama regime?

Alberta, Canada

might also try Australia
10.6.2008 12:38am
MS (mail):
Jerry F &subpatre,

Ireland. Though I truly hope you'll stick around and give us dems a chance. You've been all-time QB for eight years now. And, really, how much worse could it get?
10.6.2008 12:42am
MQuinn:
I agree with those that have expressed dissatisfaction with the typical "news" commentary -- let a democrat argue with a republican. With this setup, viewers receive two distorted versions of the facts, and viewers inch no closer to the truth.
10.6.2008 12:44am
Steve2:
Why did American civilization adopt and "early to bed, early to rise" schedule instead of a sensible "late to bed, late to rise" schedule, or an even more schedule "up a few hours, take a siesta, up a few more hours" schedule?
10.6.2008 12:47am
Glenn W. Bowen (mail):

Why did American civilization adopt and "early to bed, early to rise" schedule instead of a sensible "late to bed, late to rise" schedule, or an even more schedule "up a few hours, take a siesta, up a few more hours" schedule?


..."pizza".
10.6.2008 12:50am
OrinKerr:
my party right or wrong, eh Orin?

??
10.6.2008 12:50am
Jonathan H. Adler (mail) (www):
The Phillies have won their first post-season series since 1993, and hockey season is (kinda sorta) underway. Oh happy day!

JHA
10.6.2008 12:57am
Volokh Groupie:
Cadbury Creme Eggs

Why do they sell the smaller version in the US when every thing else is larger here in terms of food portions?
10.6.2008 1:01am
Cory J (mail):
The Steelers won, despite the continued incompetence of the coaching staff. This puts them in a tie at the top of the AFC.

What team do you NFL fans think is on top of each respective conference? I love the Steelers, but they have too many flaws, especially on the offensive line and Bruce Arians is an awful coordinator. I'm going to give my vote to the Titans. They have a great defense and are led by one of my favorite college players ever, Kerry Collins (I'm a PSU grad, so I'm a bit biased.)

NFC, I'd have to go with the Redskins. They're very balanced, Jim Zorn seems to really have a good handle on his team, and Jason Campbell is maturing into a very fine QB.
10.6.2008 1:02am
Elmer:

Steve2:
Why did American civilization adopt and "early to bed, early to rise" schedule instead of a sensible "late to bed, late to rise" schedule, or an even more schedule "up a few hours, take a siesta, up a few more hours" schedule?

David Hackett Fischer says that was the Puritan pattern. It also makes sense in a cool climate for a society based on small scale agriculture. The Virginia pattern was different.
10.6.2008 1:04am
Volokh Groupie:
I'd go with the team that's already beat the Redskins this season, also has a maturing QB and has a SB to boot.

Oh yeah, and they did this to the Skins vaunted new safety:

Brandon Jacobs vs. Laron Landry
10.6.2008 1:05am
Alexia:
How do you realistically separate social conservativism from economic conservatism?
10.6.2008 1:05am
Lev:
How will the US survive BO + Reid + Pelosi et al.


give us dems a chance. You've been all-time QB for eight years now. And, really, how much worse could it get?


A lot lot worse.
10.6.2008 1:10am
MS (mail):
Alexia,

An education.
10.6.2008 1:10am
MS (mail):
Lev,

That's BHO to you. President BHO.
10.6.2008 1:11am
Cory J (mail):
Volokh Groupie,

The Giants are a very good team but the Redskins are playing better than they did in Week 1 for sure.

I personally think Eli is overrated. If he didn't have the last name Manning, you wouldn't hear all the talk about him. He's gotten a lot better, but even in the Super Bowl season he looked lost at times.

I'd probably but Giants #2, though. They are good. I think if TO doesn't implode the Cowboys have a good chance. That offense is dangerous, and I'm not a big believer in "Romo is a choker".
10.6.2008 1:12am
Volokh Groupie:
@steve2

because the progenitors of American civilization weren't blessed with marijuana, a 5-5-5 deal and Metalocalypse.
10.6.2008 1:12am
Cornellian (mail):
How do you realistically separate social conservativism from economic conservatism?

It is the fusion of the two that is unusual, at least in historic terms and at least in so far as the term "economic conservatism" is understood in the United States today. Parties labeled "conservative" in other countries often have economic policies that are not conservative in the American sense. They're considered conservative for non-economic reasons.
10.6.2008 1:17am
Bill Poser (mail) (www):
Here are my suggestions:

non-Christian social conservatives: Saudi Arabia
Catholic reactionaries: Vatican City
Protestant social-conservatives: Idaho?
small government conservatives: Somalia
robber baron conservatives: Russia
10.6.2008 1:18am
js5 (mail):
Bill, what about non-religious fiscal conservatives?
10.6.2008 1:19am
Volokh Groupie:
@Coryj

It's funny--I'm a giants fan and was probably the biggest critic of eli last year. The last game I saw in person was their game against Minnesota last year where Eli threw 4 picks. Prior to that I'd wanted him benched/traded/jettisoned to the sun for a year or so and annoyed my family/friends by only referring to him as 'sheli'. What was frustrating about him was that it was all mental. His mechanics were ok, he had a strong arm, he'd run through progressions well--but occasionally he'd throw off his back foot, run into d-lineman, and throw into traffic.

Since the playoffs though, its like he's finally started to get it and has cut down on his mental mistakes. I've come to the point where I honestly think that he's finally matured into the good quarterback he can be. Sure there's a chance he could regress--but even then he'd still be a middle of the pack nfl qb..and with the rest of the Giants team that's not bad.

As for the 'Redskins' have improved from week 1 argument--It just doesn't sway me. The Giants have also improved, their red zone offense and overall offense has improved. They were playing their first game w/o osi, strahan and a couple old defenders at lb and in the secondary. They also just plain out physical-ed the skins that game. That said, I don't have too much of a problem with skins at 1--the giants-skins game wasn't a blowout and it was at home, so the skins might be able to win on their home turf.
10.6.2008 1:19am
Cornellian (mail):
Cornellian said: "Depends on whether you mean economic conservatives, social conservatives or some other type of conservative."

OK, any of the above. Which countries?


Social conservatives can find lots of countries where abortion is illegal and same sex relationships are frowned upon. But nearly all of them are third world countries with medieval economies. Some might wonder why that is the case but that's another issue. Among first world countries, think only Ireland would qualify, though I'm not sure about Japan, Taiwan or South Korea.

As for economic conservative, hard to say as that's a matter of degree. The Canadian province of Alberta is probably more economically conservative than the American states of California or Massachusetts.
10.6.2008 1:21am
Frater Plotter:
Where should conservatives flee to, to escape the tyranny of an Obama administration?

Authoritarian conservatives -- law-and-order types, who want to see the dregs and drugs beaten down on a regular basis -- might consider Italy.

A strong, traditional religious culture combines with a government with close ties to right-wing media; Fox News fans can feel safe with Berlusconi. There are plenty of terrorists available to be repressed, thanks to a long history of political violence -- which also provides a steady if small supply of neo-Nazis and other enthusiastic supporters of the far right.

Italy is, of course, the birthplace of Fascism, and they don't forget it. Benito Mussolini's granddaughter is an M.E.P. from Italy, who famously said, "It is better to be a fascist than a faggot." Concomitantly, there is a famously high level of police brutality both against actual offenders and against social deviants and political radicals who have not committed a crime yet.

Also, there's tasty food.

National-security conservatives with less interest in explicit authoritarianism might try Poland. This post-Communist country reveres Ronald Reagan as a liberator, and actively seeks to integrate with NATO. Until quite recently, Poland was an active and enthusiastic participant in the Iraq war.

Like most conservative-friendly European countries, both Italy and Poland are Catholic. This may pose a problem for some American conservatives of an evangelical bent. However, both countries have religious freedom today; it is legal to be a Protestant, although denigrating the Pope or publicly speculating that he may be the Antichrist and/or Emperor Palpatine may be officially frowned upon.

Religious conservatives may, however, prefer to hole up in Thailand, secure in the confidence that nobody will force them out of the closet. While Thailand is officially Buddhist rather than Christian, it is legal to preach the Good News to any ladyboys or young prostitutes willing to listen.

Economic conservatives have their usual range of options, including the always-entertaining and hurricane-prone Caribbean. Anarcho-capitalists may favor Somalia, where a lack of government has continued to stimulate the economy and armed insurance companies routinely provide security to the populace.
10.6.2008 1:22am
Hoosier:
Australia

Just stay out of the water.
10.6.2008 1:23am
Bill Poser (mail) (www):

Bill, what about non-religious fiscal conservatives?


Good question. Maybe Switzerland?
10.6.2008 1:23am
Cory J (mail):
@Volokh Groupie:

I agree Eli has the physical tools and that he had a lot of mental mistakes his first few years. He looks light years better than even the beginning of last year. I recall a lot of commentators saying Eli lacked the leadership qualities and "take-charge" mentality in the huddle. Funny that a Super Bowl win takes all that away!

It's nice there's so many good young QBs in the league. Manning, Roethlisberger, Rivers, Romo, Brees, and Palmer (although he's struggling lately) are all very good already. Campbell and Edwards are on the verge, and Aaron Rodgers looks good already. Even the rookies, Flacco (he impressed me against the Steelers last week) and Ryan, look good.

I've finally finished the few things I neglected to do during the Steelers game, so I'm heading to bed. Goodnight!
10.6.2008 1:31am
ticker:
The news about Lehman from the bankruptcy court is startling. According to creditors, JP Morgan “froze” Lehman's bank account, causing the immediate liquidity crisis leading to bankruptcy.


JP Morgan ‘brought down’ Lehman Brothers
:
JP MORGAN has been accused by its Wall Street rivals of dealing the final hammer blow that forced Lehman Brothers into collapse in a sensational claim that threatens to spark a colossal legal battle.


Lehman Cash Crunch Caused by Lender JPMorgan, Creditors Say:
Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.'s main lender and clearing agent, JPMorgan Chase &Co., caused the liquidity crisis that led to Lehman's collapse, creditors said.

JPMorgan had more than $17 billion of Lehman's cash and securities three days before the investment bank filed the biggest bankruptcy in history on Sept. 15, the creditors committee said in a filing Oct. 2 in bankruptcy court in Manhattan. Denying Lehman access to the assets on Sept. 12, the bank “froze” Lehman's account, the creditors claimed.


A few people have pointed out that banks aren't allowed to just seize depositors' accounts.
10.6.2008 1:32am
Cory J (mail):
You can tell I'm tired, since I repeated the phrase "look good" or some variation of it in three sentences in a row.
10.6.2008 1:32am
Jon Roland (mail) (www):
You guys have too much time on your hands. Let's get your reaction to this:

Congressmen were threatened on Monday with the imposition of
Martial Law if they failed to pass the bailout bill.

Rep. Brad Sherman (D-OH):


"The only way they can pass this bill is by creating and sustaining a panic atmosphere. That atmosphere in not justified. Many of us were told in private conversations that if we voted against this bill, on Monday, that the sky would fall, the market would fall 2 or 3 thousand points the first day, another couple thousand the second day, and a few members were even told that there would be martial law in America if we voted no.

That's what I call fear-mongering. Unjustified. Proven wrong.

We've got a week. We've got two weeks to write a good bill. The only way to pass a bad bill - keep the panic pressure on."


Comments?
10.6.2008 1:35am
D.A.:
Governor Palin owes quite a bit in back income taxes.
Analysis here:
Bojack
10.6.2008 1:38am
Jon Roland (mail) (www):
Let's consider how bad the financial meltdown could get: the collapse of all national currencies and a return to a barter economy. What do we do to manage the resulting situation?

Many of the Ron Paul and similar groups are talking about organizing committees of safety to maintain order and alleviate the adverse consequences, independent of the government.

Comments?
10.6.2008 1:41am
js5 (mail):
Close! My first thought was Hong Kong. In fact, I'm looking for jobs in that area for the summer. I'd probably also suggest New Zealand too, but I say this with only a little bit of research on my part.

the caribbean wouldn't be half as bad, but I get the impression (almost every year) that the rebuilding involves protection against only category 1 hurricanes.
10.6.2008 1:42am
js5 (mail):
Jon Roland: perhaps not a bad idea; I've never found that contingency plans are bad ideas, even if never used. I think they're moderately overhyping the likely outcome (not to forget that crowd knows its stuff and hasn't been wrong so far as I can tell). My girlfriend lives in downtown Philly, and I've already made plans with her in light of something like this happening. I explained to her the psychological impact and short-term consequences if such an event like this were to occur. That said, I think it's easier to react more rationally when you have already contemplated different outcomes.
10.6.2008 1:48am
SMatthewStolte (mail):
Why doesn't Randy Barnett post more?
10.6.2008 1:48am
theobromophile (www):
The Sox just lost - 12 innings later. Sigh. :(
10.6.2008 1:54am
MS (mail):
Ticker,

Interesting, but be careful quoting creditor attornies. They're asbestos lawyers for rich people.
10.6.2008 2:02am
Volokh Groupie:
@SMatthewStolte

cosign his question--where is that guy?

@theobromophile

It amazes me that the baseball Gods have rewarded a dbag like pedroia so much.

Serious question--

Does anybody think that Katyal's role in Kennedy v. Louisiana is his jockeying for a scotus nomination?
10.6.2008 2:10am
Little Robby (mail) (www):
10.6.2008 2:16am
MS (mail):
Volokh Groupie,


Does anybody think that Katyal's role in Kennedy v. Louisiana is his jockeying for a scotus nomination?



I think after decisions like Parents Involved and Gratz, the Left has found religion on democracy. There are only two Democrat appointees on the Court. If McCain wins, it's going to be all minimalism all the time from law professors.
10.6.2008 2:21am
Syd Henderson (mail):

Jerry F:
What I have in mind these days is, which country should conservatives go to in the event that they do not feel that they can live under an Obama regime?


Bhutan. Last time I looked, they decided traffic lights were too big an imposition.
10.6.2008 2:25am
Constructively Reasonable (www):
2L year sucks. I am putting the finishing touches on my Moot Court Brief now, I have not read for tomorrow, and I have an outline due Tuesday.

I preferred 1L year.
10.6.2008 2:26am
Syd Henderson (mail):
Why would anybody add anise to food? I can understand why you might add it to cough drops or candy, but why would you want your lunch to taste like licorice?

And, as a corollary, why is there Ouzo?
10.6.2008 2:27am
MS (mail):
Little Robby,

Nice, but Silver is only predicting 55.9 senate seats for the dems. Nuclear option!
10.6.2008 2:28am
markH (mail):
Didn't McCain say "We are all Georgians?". If you want to leave to escape the Obama Regime, I suggest you go to Georgia.

America, baby: love it or leave it.

And please take Palin with you. Her gibberish makes my ears bleed.
10.6.2008 2:37am
Barry P. (mail):
Jerry F.:

You might want to consider the UAE. Laissez-faire economics, one of the highest per capita GDPs in the world, no taxes, the finest in luxury housing, shopping and dining, dark-skinned lowly-paid indentured servants and you can drive 100 mph legally. Plus, they imprison gays, whip adulterous women, edit bare boobies out of movies, protect their citizens from filth on the internet and strongly encourage praying five times a day. It's like a cross between the antebellum South and Utah without the snow.

Family values and free economics. What more could a conservative ask for?
10.6.2008 2:45am
Allan (mail):
North Korea seems about right.
10.6.2008 2:48am
Jon Roland (mail) (www):
js5:

Jon Roland: perhaps not a bad idea; I've never found that contingency plans are bad ideas, even if never used.

A Committee of Safety was created by public election in Texas in 1995. The story is here.
10.6.2008 2:51am
js5 (mail):
can't one have family values without religion?
10.6.2008 2:51am
Volokh Groupie:
Conversely, if you want 'equitable' wealth distribution, greater national control of industries, and a rejection of religion in favor of worshiping a politician (with requisite children-led songs and salutes to him/her) I hear Venezuela, China and Zimbabwe are nice this time of year (and don't tell me you think ZPF will give anyone a fair shake in the latter in spite of the elections).
10.6.2008 2:57am
Volokh Groupie:
@js5

yes. definitely

i'm an atheist and i certainly hope i have some sense of morals. though, i'd be interested in what religious leaders think of that.
10.6.2008 2:59am
Volokh Groupie:
crud..i should have added 'china' after making the 'latter' reference
10.6.2008 2:59am
Zach (www):
Amen to dssinc (11:14pm): What long-term gain have we accrued from the trillions we have spent and now owe?

Also, why aren't we exploring outer space with vigor? Or colonizing mars, or identifying *every* large object in the Solar System? Whether these things are possible or not, we should certainly be trying. As long as threats to the survival of our species exist - nuclear war, global environmental collapse, etc - we must try. The human race desperately needs an insurance policy, preferably many more than just one....
10.6.2008 3:00am
Johnny Canuck (mail):
Jonathan H. Adler:
The Phillies have won their first post-season series since 1993, and hockey season is (kinda sorta) underway. Oh happy day!

And I was there for the last game of their 1993 post-season.
[Pat Gillick general manager]
10.6.2008 3:19am
Jerry F:
Thanks to everyone who gave their thoughts on where disgruntled conservatives can immigrate on November 5th.

I don't see any country that currently is as friendly as the United States to both social and fiscal conservatives; most countries mentioned have serious failings: Vatican City is not friendly to fiscal conservatism; Italy is appealing in many respects but it has an enormous welfare state (as does Poland); Japan does not fully endorse the homosexual agenda but it does encourage adultery (and many worst things); and the UAE is arguably as hostile to Christian worship as San Francisco. I am somewhat surprised that no one mentioned Singapore, which I thought had a good combination of fiscal and social (although not religious) conservatism. All that said, depending on how bad things get under an Obama Administration, any of these countries could become the lesser of two evils.
10.6.2008 3:26am
Barry P. (mail):
The UAE is not hostile to Christian worship - indeed, the country's fundng ruler donated land and money for the construction of churches. They don't like open proselytizing (attempting to convert Moslems is an absolute no-no), but are very acceptng of worship by Christians.

In my experience, many devout Moslems actually prefer devout Christians to secular westerners. I guess they feel like they have some sort of "true-believer" kinship, even if they're different truths.

My only problem with the UAE was that the tech staff at the state internet company got too good at blocking porn (i.e., cutting off access to TOR and proxy servers), so I had to come back to the States. I can live without the right to petition the local government for greviances, but no smut? Sorry.
10.6.2008 3:50am
timd:
How did this election become so boring?

A few months ago, I would have predicted that a McCain-Obama match-up would be great fun and possibly even important.

Sigh.
10.6.2008 4:05am
Perseus (mail):
Why have the sane Volokh conspirators allowed their more insane fellows to devolve into such caricatures?

Where did Orin Kerr hide my tin foil hat?
10.6.2008 4:19am
one of many:
Cadbury Creme Eggs

Why do they sell the smaller version in the US when every thing else is larger here in terms of food portions?

Whatchotalkinbout Willis? 12OZ beers instead of a decent pint? Actually most US candy portions are smaller than UK ones, a US Snickers bar is 15% smaller than a UK Snickers (Marathon) bar. I suspect it is puritanism which caused smaller "sinful" item portions to crop up in the US, but I doubt anyone will ever really know the truth.
10.6.2008 4:26am
Abandon:
The upcoming elections are depressing you? Could be worse. Take me for an example, I am Canadian, and I hate hockey. Also, we have our own elections too...
10.6.2008 4:43am
Cornellian (mail):
And how are those elections going, by the way? Saw a passing reference to them a few weeks ago, then they promptly dropped off the radar screen. I assume if the election had happened by now we'd have heard about it.
10.6.2008 6:06am
Cornellian (mail):
Why do brilliant, awesome shows like Battlestar Galactica get canceled after four seasons while crap shows seem to drag on forever?
10.6.2008 6:12am
Steve2:
Cornellian, I heard the writers only ever planned 4 seasons of BSG.
10.6.2008 7:42am
Hoosier:
js5
"can't one have family values without religion?"

Sure. But he can't explain the fundamental reason why he holds those values. (Don't blame me: Dostoevsky said it first.)
10.6.2008 8:12am
Hoosier:
"Bhutan. Last time I looked, they decided traffic lights were too big an imposition."

They are (No cars).
10.6.2008 8:19am
Bored Lawyer:

Nothing can take the bloat off a political party and sharpen its purpose than being in the minority.


I have been thinking along the lines of Loophole for some time. I think it will do the Republican party an enormous amount of good to take a real beating in this election. Remind them why we won in the past and why we lost now. (Hint: it's a word that begins with the letter P. Sounds like the guy who ran your high school, only its spelled differently.)

The country will survive four years of Obama, just like it survived four years of Jimmy Carter. Might even be instructional as to who Obama really is and what he really believes in.

(Anyone for Newt Gingrich in 2012 or 2016?)
10.6.2008 8:43am
Bored Lawyer:

Nothing can take the bloat off a political party and sharpen its purpose than being in the minority.


I have been thinking along the lines of Loophole for some time. I think it will do the Republican party an enormous amount of good to take a real beating in this election. Remind them why we won in the past and why we lost now. (Hint: it's a word that begins with the letter P. Sounds like the guy who ran your high school, only its spelled differently.)

The country will survive four years of Obama, just like it survived four years of Jimmy Carter. Might even be instructional as to who Obama really is and what he really believes in.

(Anyone for Newt Gingrich in 2012 or 2016?)
10.6.2008 8:43am
Bored Lawyer:

Nothing can take the bloat off a political party and sharpen its purpose than being in the minority.


I have been thinking along the lines of Loophole for some time. I think it will do the Republican party an enormous amount of good to take a real beating in this election. Remind them why we won in the past and why we lost now. (Hint: it's a word that begins with the letter P. Sounds like the guy who ran your high school, only its spelled differently.)

The country will survive four years of Obama, just like it survived four years of Jimmy Carter. Might even be instructional as to who Obama really is and what he really believes in.

(Anyone for Newt Gingrich in 2012 or 2016?)
10.6.2008 8:43am
Reg Dunlop:
Whether I should get large or even extra large blue crabs to steam, rather than the No. 1 males I have been getting.
10.6.2008 8:45am
Bored Lawyer:

Nothing can take the bloat off a political party and sharpen its purpose than being in the minority.


I have been thinking along the lines of Loophole for some time. I think it will do the Republican party an enormous amount of good to take a real beating in this election. Remind them why we won in the past and why we lost now. (Hint: it's a word that begins with the letter P. Sounds like the guy who ran your high school, only its spelled differently.)

The country will survive four years of Obama, just like it survived four years of Jimmy Carter. Might even be instructional as to who Obama really is and what he really believes in.

(Anyone for Newt Gingrich in 2012 or 2016?)
10.6.2008 9:08am
Arkady:
Let's have a debate on this:


"The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers". - (Henry VI, Act IV, Scene II).


Is this a good idea?
10.6.2008 9:37am
theobromophile (www):
Arkady,

Didn't the characters say that would be the first step in destroying civilisation?

Others, regarding where to flee: a small hole in the mountains in Colorado. Bring gold. There are countries in which religious conservatism flourishes, but few (if any) in which libertarianism is a viable option.
10.6.2008 9:51am
CVMe:
Bring back orinkerr.com so we don't have to see all this Lindgren and Bernstein nonsense.
10.6.2008 9:59am
Arkady:

Arkady,

Didn't the characters say that would be the first step in destroying civilisation?


Nay, t'was a full-throated cry of populism 'gainst the wretched elites who aburdened sturdy, simple folk with their learned jesuitical casuisms:



Cade: There shall be in England seven halfpenny loaves sold for a penny; the three-hooped pot shall have ten hoops; and I will make it a felony to drink small beer. All the realm shall be in common, and in Cheapside shall my palfrey go to pass. And when I am king -- as king I will be -- there shall be no money; all shall eat and drink on my score; and I will apparel them all in one livery, that they may agree like brothers, and worship me their lord.

Dick: The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.

Cade: Nay, that I mean to do. Is not this a lamentable thing, that of the skin of an innocent lamb should be made parchment, being scribbled o'er, should undo a man: Some say the bee stings; but I say, "tis the bee's wax: for I did but seal once to a thing, and I was never mine own man since."
10.6.2008 10:03am
Chuck (mail):
All righty then folks -- How about a review of behavior based legal restrictions, specifically: Breastfeeding!

Up until the 1950s, breastfeeding was the norm, even to the point of WPA Posters advocating it in the 1930s and also in WWII. The post-war social infatuation with all things scientific was no doubt part of the movement toward bottle feeding, but that also affected the public acceptability of public breastfeeding. Recent years have seen a return to breastfeeding and state laws have been changing to accommodate this reflecting the social changes supporting breastfeeding.

Many of these laws are tied to or subsets of laws regarding "indecent" behavior, such as restricting the public exposure of the breast below the upper limit of the areola, but then permitting this act when part of the process of nursing. Similarly, there have been bare breasts as part of political speech, so gaining 1st Amd protection, and other rulings apparently associated with 14th Amd equal treatment rules applied to bare chests (such as New York). Contrary to this, some police, such as in Ohio, have invoked "disorderly conduct" rules to restrict bare women's chests in public. Other parts of Ohio think differently, such as in Columbus. Male chests remain acceptable - mostly.

So -- On the premise that breastfeeding is normal, proper, and legal, how should laws be written to distinguish this act from public improprieties? Should it be conditional vs a norm of public bare chests are entirely acceptable, regardless of sex? Does/should it need a tie to alcohol related guidelines, such as stripper/dancer rules? How to coordinate, distinguish and codify these two disparate aspects of behavior? What other legal issues bear on this topic that entangle legitimate prosecution of public disorder without suffocating individual rights?

Discuss....
10.6.2008 10:42am
Tom952 (mail):
I invite the great minds of the VC to apply themselves to solving the problem of a lack of a playoff in American NCAA college football.

Why has the NCAA and the television networks allowed a group of hotel, restaurant, and bar owners, calling themselves the official sounding "BCS", to hijack the college football post-season and use it to support a throng of meaningless pageant bowls, which are sadly but sometimes more accurately termed "liquor bowls"? How can we true and faithful fans of the sport usurp the frustrating and disappointing BCS and replace it with a three or four round post-season playoff tournament that will yield seven or fifteen exciting and dramatic contests capped with a satisfying season ending finale to establish the nation's college football champion?

Surely this serious problem is worth the attention of the nation's greatest legal minds.
10.6.2008 10:48am
Tom952 (mail):
I would invite the great minds of the VC to apply themselves to solving the problem of a lack of a playoff in NCAA college football.

Why has the NCAA and the television networks allowed a group of hotel, restaurant, and bar owners calling themselves the BCS to hijack the college football post-season and use it to support a throng of meaningless pageant bowls, which are sadly but sometimes more accurately termed "liquor bowls"? How can we true and faithful fans of the sport usurp the frustrating and disappointing BCS and replace it with a three or four round post-season playoff tournament that will yield seven or fifteen exciting and dramatic contests capped with a satisfying season ending finale to establish the nation's college football champion?

Surely this serious problem is worth the attention of the nation's greatest legal minds.
10.6.2008 10:48am
js5 (mail):
Hoosier: except when I say I choose them myself.
10.6.2008 10:55am
carr1on:
Bored Lawyer: I agree but not for the same reasons that you do. I think the Republicans need a beating to remind them that Reagan (blessed be his name) espoused a big tent philosphy, and wasn't an idealogue. there's a reason why he got those pesky Democrats to vote for him.

You, and others of your ilk, think the answer to the Republican's problems is to become more idealogical and extreme. Those young House Repoublicans are a prime example of this. And seriously, Newt?!?

Here is a topic: is anyone else scared of the mix of fundamentalist religion and fundamentalist politics? All you have to do is look at the modern Republican Party to see what this marriage produces.
10.6.2008 11:14am
Smokey:
This guy is having a worse day than the stock market.
10.6.2008 11:34am
PLR:
We haven't had an open thread in a long time. What's on your mind?

If your alma mater is playing the University of Missouri in football, (a) you'd better win the coin toss, and (b) you'd better elect to receive.
10.6.2008 11:40am
PLR:
We haven't had an open thread in a long time. What's on your mind?

If your alma mater is playing the University of Missouri in football, (a) you'd better win the coin toss, and (b) you'd better elect to receive.
10.6.2008 11:40am
ChrisIowa (mail):
I remember a headline from 1964, I think it was in US News.

"Will the Dow Ever Hit 1,000?"

It may be appropriate today.
10.6.2008 11:49am
Hoosier:

js5
Hoosier: except when I say I choose them myself.

Your choice is based on what?
10.6.2008 11:53am
Top-ranked student at a lower-ranked school:
Rather than taking on loads of debt, I selected a lower-ranked law school which offered merit-based scholarship. Now, I am set to graduate in May with zero student loans.

While I may not be equivalent to the top students at Stanford or Cornell, I should be academically competitive with the top 25% of UCLA/Northwestern.

But despite my top grades, I cannot get an interview with the large law firms because I do not attend a higher-ranked school.

So you conservatives out there (ahem, Gibson Dunn, ahem): Why doesn't the hiring market reward fiscally conservative choices? Theoretically, you should be able to hire me (and my cohorts) at lower wages.
10.6.2008 12:35pm
Bored Lawyer:

Bored Lawyer: I agree but not for the same reasons that you do. I think the Republicans need a beating to remind them that Reagan (blessed be his name) espoused a big tent philosphy, and wasn't an idealogue. there's a reason why he got those pesky Democrats to vote for him.

You, and others of your ilk, think the answer to the Republican's problems is to become more idealogical and extreme. Those young House Repoublicans are a prime example of this. And seriously, Newt?!?


At the time, Reagan was considered by many to be an ideological extremists, whose views would get us into a nuclear confrontation.

True, Reagan attracted Democratic votes, and that was a great strength. But he did not do it by being wishy-washy -- he did it by emphasizing the principals which attracted both traditional Republicans and the Reagan Democrats.

Newt headed the Republican effort to recapture control of Congress after it had been held by the Democrats for 50 years. That effort was squandered by his successors who then proceeded to engage in the same shenanigans -- pork spending, etc. I'd be much happier to have Newt as President than McCain.
10.6.2008 12:36pm
Bluebooker (mail):
The new "protect marriage" ad just came out. It miscites Parker v. Hurley as 414 F.3d 87 (1st Cir. 2008). It should be 514 F.3d 87 (1st Cir. 2008). I guess that's what they get with "Professor" Peterson, a clinical professor who's FAR from being a Con Law scholar, posing like a real academic.

http://www.protectmarriage.com/
10.6.2008 12:43pm
Cornellian (mail):

So you conservatives out there (ahem, Gibson Dunn, ahem): Why doesn't the hiring market reward fiscally conservative choices? Theoretically, you should be able to hire me (and my cohorts) at lower wages.


Because Gibson Dunn is fixated on academics to a greater extent than most other large law firms. I read a story once somewhere that they wanted to see a transcript for a possible lateral partner who'd been practicing for something like a decade. Hard to see the point, but that's the style over at GDC.

More generally, firms have nothing to go on in making hiring decisions other than your academic record. Where you went to law school is part of that record. Ergo it has a huge impact on whether you get interviewed and whether you get an offer. It may not be fair but that's the way it works.

If you're not at a top school (there are approximately 14 to 20 of them, depending on who you ask) you're generally not getting an interview with a major international firm unless you're magna cum laude and law review, or you have fantastic connections (e.g. your last name is Buffett, Gates or Jobs). Note that locally strong schools can beat this rule to some extent, but only with respect to the offices of a law firm that are in the city/region where the school is located.
10.6.2008 12:47pm
Jerome Cole (mail) (www):

But despite my top grades, I cannot get an interview with the large law firms because I do not attend a higher-ranked school.

So you conservatives out there (ahem, Gibson Dunn, ahem): Why doesn't the hiring market reward fiscally conservative choices? Theoretically, you should be able to hire me (and my cohorts) at lower wages.


What school did you go to? I took a look at the websites of several major law firms in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Portland, and Seattle. It seems that most have lots and lots of lawyers from schools like Cardozo, Brooklyn, Lewis &Clark, Oregon, San Francisco, etc.

It seems to me that you must have gone to a really, really poorly regarded school or you have not been aggressive enough in your search.
10.6.2008 1:08pm
Jerome Cole (mail) (www):

But despite my top grades, I cannot get an interview with the large law firms because I do not attend a higher-ranked school.

So you conservatives out there (ahem, Gibson Dunn, ahem): Why doesn't the hiring market reward fiscally conservative choices? Theoretically, you should be able to hire me (and my cohorts) at lower wages.


What school did you go to? I took a look at the websites of several major law firms in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Portland, and Seattle. It seems that most have lots and lots of lawyers from schools like Cardozo, Brooklyn, Lewis &Clark, Oregon, San Francisco, etc.

It seems to me that you must have gone to a really, really poorly regarded school or you have not been aggressive enough in your search.
10.6.2008 1:08pm
Jerome Cole (mail) (www):

But despite my top grades, I cannot get an interview with the large law firms because I do not attend a higher-ranked school.

So you conservatives out there (ahem, Gibson Dunn, ahem): Why doesn't the hiring market reward fiscally conservative choices? Theoretically, you should be able to hire me (and my cohorts) at lower wages.


What school did you go to? I took a look at the websites of several major law firms in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Portland, and Seattle. It seems that most have lots and lots of lawyers from schools like Cardozo, Brooklyn, Lewis &Clark, Oregon, San Francisco, etc.

It seems to me that you must have gone to a really, really poorly regarded school or you have not been aggressive enough in your search.
10.6.2008 1:09pm
wuzzagrunt (mail):
one of many:

Actually most US candy portions are smaller than UK ones, a US Snickers bar is 15% smaller than a UK Snickers (Marathon) bar. I suspect it is puritanism which caused smaller "sinful" item portions to crop up in the US, but I doubt anyone will ever really know the truth.

But do they have deep fried Snickers bars? With powdered sugar on 'em? Puritanism must have been on holiday when that was thought up.
10.6.2008 1:44pm
RPT (mail):
What do the conservatives think about McCain's record of crashing planes?
10.6.2008 2:34pm
Houston Lawyer:
Top Ranked

No one at any big firm cares that you didn't incur debt in your choice of law school. They may even see it as a negative. Graduates with a full debt load need the job more than you do. We also like to see associates buy a house, get married and have kids. That means they really need the job.
10.6.2008 2:40pm
wuzzagrunt (mail):
RPT:

What do the conservatives think about McCain's record of crashing planes?

What do liberals think of Teddy Kennedy's record of crashing cars?
10.6.2008 2:53pm
Abandon:
Cornellian:

And how are those elections going, by the way? Saw a passing reference to them a few weeks ago, then they promptly dropped off the radar screen. I assume if the election had happened by now we'd have heard about it.


The current electoral campaign might be the most obnoxious I have witnessed in my lifetime. We'll probably end up with another minority conservative government, thanks to the actual lack of flavour in the Liberal Party.
10.6.2008 3:09pm
Jon Rowe (mail) (www):
Since this is an open thread, I'd encourage you to check out my new blog American Creation which is one of the only if not the only blog dedicated solely to issues of religion &the American Founding. My particular focus is studying the personal religion of America's key Founders: Washington, J. Adams, Jefferson, Madison, &Franklin and I have discovered that 1) they were neither Christians nor Deists (strictly defined) and 2) whatever it is we call such, all 5 of these key Founders believed the same basic things about God's attributes. Therefore the irony of the election 1800: It was thought to be Jefferson the infidel v. Adams the Christian. This misunderstanding persists to today. Again, whatever we call their creed, Adams &Jefferson believed the same thing about God and His attributues.

It's not just me; it's a group blog with secular leftists religious rightists, Mormons, evangelicals, Roman Catholics, atheists, agnostics, all over and in between.

If interested check it out.
10.6.2008 3:29pm
Jon Rowe (mail) (www):
Since this is an open thread, I'd encourage you to check out my new blog American Creation which is one of the only if not the only blog dedicated solely to issues of religion &the American Founding. My particular focus is studying the personal religion of America's key Founders: Washington, J. Adams, Jefferson, Madison, &Franklin and I have discovered that 1) they were neither Christians nor Deists (strictly defined) and 2) whatever it is we call such, all 5 of these key Founders believed the same basic things about God's attributes. Therefore the irony of the election 1800: It was thought to be Jefferson the infidel v. Adams the Christian. This misunderstanding persists to today. Again, whatever we call their creed, Adams &Jefferson believed the same thing about God and His attributues.

It's not just me; it's a group blog with secular leftists religious rightists, Mormons, evangelicals, Roman Catholics, atheists, agnostics, all over and in between.

If interested check it out.
10.6.2008 3:29pm
David Warner:
OK,

Let's be honest - open threads are an embarrassment typical of blogs like LGF and Kos, not of high-minded law blogs like this one. I expect better of you and expect you to live up to my expectations!

Fear my shame!
10.6.2008 3:46pm
one of many:
But do they have deep fried Snickers bars? With powdered sugar on 'em? Puritanism must have been on holiday when that was thought up.

Well yes they do. I actually don't know which side of the Atlantic the deep-fried candy bar originated on and seem to recall both sides claim to have invented it. Far more common in the UK though, it sometimes seems that anyone with some hot oil in UK sells deep-fried candy bars. The Scots have a solid claim on the invention of deep-fried Twinkie, but that's a separate issue.

Stay away from the deep- fried Snickers though, go with the Mars or 3 Musketeers. the Snickers fries up unevenly and you get these super-hot bits which are painful as well as cold bits which don't fry. You want something with an even consistency for deep frying.
10.6.2008 4:17pm
Thales (mail) (www):
"what about non-religious fiscal conservatives"

Try the U.S., under a Democratic administration (vide Bill Clinton/Robert Rubin).
10.6.2008 4:20pm
wuzzagrunt (mail):
one of many:

But do they have deep fried Snickers bars? With powdered sugar on 'em? Puritanism must have been on holiday when that was thought up.



Well yes they do. I actually don't know which side of the Atlantic the deep-fried candy bar originated on and seem to recall both sides claim to have invented it. Far more common in the UK though, it sometimes seems that anyone with some hot oil in UK sells deep-fried candy bars.

I only learned of them a short time ago, and they seem to be more of a rural vice. From what I understand, they are ubiquitous at country fairs and such. I've never tried any, and would rather consume my empty calories in the form of pints of English ale or Irish stout. I will let the Brits take credit for the fried candy bar insanity--even though it seems like exactly the kind of thing Minnesotans would invent. Or, blame it on the Germans!
10.6.2008 5:25pm
Jon Roland (mail) (www):
Anyone going to the Federalist Society National Convention who would like to share a room? I hate to spend $219/night for a room just for myself when I can split the cost with someone.
10.6.2008 6:52pm
Careless:

it is legal to be a Protestant, although denigrating the Pope or publicly speculating that he may be the Antichrist and/or Emperor Palpatine may be officially frowned upon.

So other people did know that the Pope appears to be a Sith lord in white robes! I thought I was the only one.
10.6.2008 7:26pm
24AheadDotCom (mail) (www):
I'm trying to push a plan that would make both BHO and the MSM look very bad, but so far I haven't had any luck.

I want regular people to go to campaign appearances and ask BHO real questions, and then upload his response to Youtube. If the response is "good", that would make BHO look very, very bad and it might get millions of views. It would also make the MSM look very bad.

If anyone wants to help, go ask questions. If you can't do that, then encourage those supposed BHO opponents listed at the link to encourage their readers to ask questions.
10.6.2008 7:49pm
Steve2:

Well yes they do. I actually don't know which side of the Atlantic the deep-fried candy bar originated on and seem to recall both sides claim to have invented it. Far more common in the UK though, it sometimes seems that anyone with some hot oil in UK sells deep-fried candy bars. The Scots have a solid claim on the invention of deep-fried Twinkie, but that's a separate issue.

Stay away from the deep- fried Snickers though, go with the Mars or 3 Musketeers. the Snickers fries up unevenly and you get these super-hot bits which are painful as well as cold bits which don't fry. You want something with an even consistency for deep frying.


Also, stay away from the deep-fried Twinkie... at least when at the state fair when there with friends who insist on going on the centrifuge ride. But in truth, I was supremely disappointed with the deep-fried Twinkie, as it was battered in what was effectively muffin batter.

On the other hand, the deep-fried cheese curds available at state fairs in dairlyand... mmmm, mmmm, good!
10.6.2008 10:08pm
Hoosier:
"So other people did know that the Pope appears to be a Sith lord in white robes! I thought I was the only one."

Naw. Benedict is one of the great men of these times.
10.6.2008 10:21pm
Careless:


There's more than a little resemblance.

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a400/InfinityBall/pope.jpg
10.7.2008 12:13am
BlackX (mail):
While I normally enjoy the comments, the political posts have brought out the worst in people and/or brought trolls in. I suspect the latter is at least partially true. While I'm not looking forward to the results of this election, hopefully the trolls will go back under the bridge afterward.
10.7.2008 12:51am
JCD (mail):
Does any of the contributors have an opinion on John McCain's proposal that the government buy individual mortgages? I recognize it's allowed by the EESA. But to do it in large numbers seems to me both stupid and preposterous. If the government buys a lender's interest in a mortgage in a securitization pool, the government has no power to modify its terms -- right?? Anyone?
10.8.2008 1:48pm
spring (mail):
Could someone please tell me who is Nancy
Grace's insurance company? If "Tot Mom" Casey Anthony procuces her live daughter in the coming days, can she sue NG for all these weeks of slanderous reporting? Could everyone in the case be on some sort of contract to deliver sensational video and testimony just to sell a TV show?
If this dumb question is not worthy of a post, would you just email me as I am frustrated by NG's offal TV show.
Thanks,
s
10.9.2008 12:41am