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Koyaanisqatsi:
The whole film, on YouTube. Cool. For background about the film, see here.
guest890:
I would like to point out the following epic sequel, also on Youtube: Nachoqatsi
4.18.2009 3:11pm
Sarcastro (www):
Hippies! Hippies I say!
4.18.2009 3:14pm
justin:
Superb. Now let's get Einstein on the Beach online!
4.18.2009 3:17pm
mattski:
I think that was the last film I smoked pot before viewing.
4.18.2009 3:42pm
Michael F. Martin (mail) (www):
Satyagraha is my fave. iPhone knows how to spell it!!!
4.18.2009 3:43pm
wb (mail):
Get the CD and make sure that you have a good sub-woofer.
4.18.2009 3:55pm
dmv (mail):
justin said:

Superb. Now let's get Einstein on the Beach online!

I say:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8...
4.18.2009 4:12pm
Bill Poser (mail) (www):
I get the message: "This video is not available in your country"! I'm in Canada, not Saudi Arabia or some such place. I wonder why it isn't available here. I'm pretty sure it isn't prohibited here.
4.18.2009 5:08pm
Steve2:
I watched this in college, in a theater design class. I've never been able to make up my mind since whether Philip Glass wrote the greatest movie score of all time or Godfrey Reggio directed the greatest music video of all time. Either way, hooray for Youtube!
4.18.2009 5:18pm
RandomGuy (mail):
Baraka is also a great movie with a similar theme.
4.18.2009 5:19pm
Chris Bell (mail):
Yes, Baraka and Chronos are similar - but in HD!
4.18.2009 5:21pm
Bruce:
Whoa. Fantastic! This has been a favorite of mine since I was 13 or however old I was when I saw it on TV. I have the soundtrack album as well.
4.18.2009 5:43pm
BRM:
That is awesome. I order this movie off Netflix every few months, but instant Youtube access is even better.
4.18.2009 6:02pm
Duffy Pratt (mail):
I agree that it's pretty great, but for the best film/music collaboration, I'd still go with Alexander Nevsky directed by Eisenstein and music by Prokofiev.
4.18.2009 6:51pm
cirby (mail):
The amazing thing is that Koyaanisqatsi isn't available on Blu-Ray...
4.18.2009 7:09pm
Bruce:
The Battleship Potemkin is not half bad either, particularly the Potemkin Steps sequence.
4.18.2009 7:45pm
DCP:

I watched this in college, in a theater design class. I've never been able to make up my mind since whether Philip Glass wrote the greatest movie score of all time or Godfrey Reggio directed the greatest music video of all time. Either way, hooray for Youtube!


The original cut (and concept even) was supposedly much different. Supposedly, when Reggio heard Glass' score music he was so overwhelmed that he did some reshooting and reedited the entire film to match the music note for note. So Glass probably deserves most of the credit.

Apparently Star Wars had a similar childhood. The original cut of the film and the special effects were a disaster but George Lucas knew right away that John Williams' score was something special and that if he could somehow clean up the film and marry it to the music then he would have a masterpiece.
4.18.2009 8:21pm
UW3L:
In college some friends and I drove 14 hours overnight to see Philip Glass perform this live with the San Francisco Symphony, with the movie projected on an enormous screen. It was, let me say, a wee bit better than watching it on YouTube. However, I'm certainly not complaining that it's online now!
4.18.2009 8:37pm
Duffy Pratt (mail):
Bruce:

Potemkin is an amazing pure silent film. The Odessa Steps sequence is still astonishing. It's as radical today as it was at that time, despite how often its been imitated or "homaged".
4.18.2009 11:50pm
Daniel J. Wojcik (mail) (www):
I really liked how it showed people taking empty, unproductive land and turning it into something useful.
4.19.2009 12:57am
Jim at FSU (mail):
This movie annoys me because I think the message is bullshit. It's basically a look into how the mind of a hunter-gatherer sees the modern world. Or a modern environmentalist. The Hopi at least had the valid excuse of not knowing any better and the decency to not drag everyone else down with them when they tried to go extinct.

Modern humans don't depend on the natural world for their survival, at least not to the extent that the enviro-weenies seem to believe. We have domesticated animals and food plants to provide for our food. We have discovered how to make plastics and metals that replace nearly everything that we once used from the natural world. If you ignore the fake apocalypse of the week, all the supposed harms we're inflicting on the natural world essentially add up to "you're destroying precious scenery."

The film is very nice to watch though.
4.19.2009 1:04am
josh bornstein (mail) (www):
Fond memories. As I recall, this was one of the holy 3 . . . the movies to do on mushrooms or acid (along with "Brainstorm" and the original "Fantasia."). Not me of course. Ah, good times . . . .
4.19.2009 1:57am
Syd Henderson (mail):
Jin: Just because a film disagrees with you does not make it a bad film. I disagree with the message of Battleship Potemkin but it's one of the greatest films ever made.
4.19.2009 2:50am
cljenn01 (mail):
Kubrick's 2001:A Space Odyssey (Blue Danube/Docking, Also Sprach Zarathustra/Monolith, Ligeti/Jupiter-Beyond the Infinite) &A Clockwork Orange (Beethoven's 9th, Wendy Carlos's Moog and Singin' in the Rain) are two of the best film/music collaborations, IMHO. Gene Kelly will never seem the same.
4.19.2009 6:50pm
Prof. S. (mail):
I own the first two of the Qatsi movies. Personally, the music in Naqoyqatsi is far superior to the other two. Yo Yo Ma's cello playing puts the soundtrack head and shoulders ahead.

As for the movies, they are all a bit weird.
4.20.2009 9:39am
Randy R. (mail):
Jim: 'We have domesticated animals and food plants to provide for our food. We have discovered how to make plastics and metals that replace nearly everything that we once used from the natural world. "

There's a lot to be sad about in a post such as this.
4.20.2009 1:56pm

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