pageok
pageok
pageok
How Cavalier Yale Was About Security:

I'm saddened to read about the apparent murder of a Yale Medical student. It reminds me that when I was at Yale, I found the university to be incredibly cavalier about security. I spent 5 semesters living in the law school dorm, and therefore walking around the immediate campus area. In that entire time, I saw exactly one police car patrolling one time. By contrast, when I attended Brandeis as an undergraduate and lived on campus, I saw campus police patrolling our much safer campus all the time.

After a law student's face was slashed right in front of the law school my first year there, Yale hired a security guard to sit inside the law school building at night. Most of the time he was asleep. This was literally the only security I ever saw in the entire law school campus.

I've visited the campus several times since then, and security seems vastly improved (from a very low threshold) following several tragic incidents involving Yale students. But given my experiences there, I wouldn't be surprised if security nevertheless remains inadequate.

Hadur:
So you're saying that law students without an offer should become crooks on the streets on New Haven?
9.14.2009 12:21pm
ruuffles (mail) (www):

By contrast, when I attended Brandeis as an undergraduate and lived on campus, I saw campus police patrolling our much safer campus all the time.

According to news reports, the body was found inside in the building and security cameras in the building didn't see anything. Based on this, I don't see how increasing patrols on the streets would help in this situation.
9.14.2009 12:25pm
Commentor (mail):
Any statistics regarding crime on campus or numbers of security guards / police to go with those anecdotes?
9.14.2009 12:25pm
Cato The Elder (mail) (www):
What is shocking to me is that the girl was found inside the basement wall of the same building that hundreds of people had previously searched. Such expertise with the topography suggests to me that her murder was an inside job, where someone local and perhaps intimate with her might not even have aroused proper security's suspicion.
9.14.2009 12:27pm
Hadur:

According to news reports, the body was found inside in the building and security cameras in the building didn't see anything. Based on this, I don't see how increasing patrols on the streets would help in this situation.


Finding the cure for AIDS wouldn't have helped Ted Kennedy, who died of cancer, so blogging about woefully inadequate AIDS funding is bad.
9.14.2009 12:28pm
Mike& (mail):
Based on this, I don't see how increasing patrols on the streets would help in this situation.

Fewer cops means less overall fear. With law enforcement, you want to create a culture of apprehension towards committing crime. How to do this without creating a mini-police state on campus is the challenge. (At my alma matter, we had too many cops with attitudes. It felt like you couldn't even breath.)
9.14.2009 12:35pm
Helen2 (mail):
Connecticut's reputation as a wealthy and idyllic state is completely undeserved. (I think that the New Yorkers who spread this false information can't see beyond Greenwich.) The crime rate in our three largest cities -- New Haven, Hartford, and Bridgeport -- is higher than in such notoriously violent locations as Chicago, Philadelphia, Oakland, CA, and East St. Louis and is just slightly lower than in Washington DC and Camden, NJ.
9.14.2009 12:40pm
ruuffles (mail) (www):

Finding the cure for AIDS wouldn't have helped Ted Kennedy, who died of cancer, so blogging about woefully inadequate AIDS funding is bad.

Well yes, if the original news item was about Ted Kennedy dying of cancer.
9.14.2009 12:41pm
Shelby (mail):
Maybe the Brandeis-Yale distinction is due to schools in the middle of major cities relying much more on the urban police force for security. I know my suburban private college had a much more visible (though usually more obnoxious) campus-cop force than did UC-Hastings, my law school in downtown San Francisco. Though the latter was still a lot more apparent than what David describes at Yale.
9.14.2009 12:48pm
JoeN:

By contrast, when I attended Brandeis as an undergraduate and lived on campus, I saw campus police patrolling our much safer campus all the time.

Yeah, they were a total BUZZKILL when I was there too.

UPenn has the most pervasive campus and near-campus security (cameras, patrols, etc) that I've ever seen, I don't know how Yale compares...
9.14.2009 12:51pm
Anon21:
As a current (but new) Yale student, I can say that even before the Le incident, I was struck by the amount of security presence on campus. There are cars everywhere, and one frequently sees officers on foot near campus buildings as well. Granted, this is not by the medical school, which is basically a separate campus, and one which I haven't visited.
9.14.2009 12:54pm
Hadur:

Maybe the Brandeis-Yale distinction is due to schools in the middle of major cities relying much more on the urban police force for security. I know my suburban private college had a much more visible (though usually more obnoxious) campus-cop force than did UC-Hastings, my law school in downtown San Francisco. Though the latter was still a lot more apparent than what David describes at Yale.


I've gone to two schools in MUCH larger cities than New Haven, and they definitely had large police forces. Though the campus police always had a reputation for being much more tolerant of rowdy student behavior than the city police.

Maybe I'm just bitter at Yale for rejecting me twice (UG, law school).
9.14.2009 12:56pm
fripper12:
I agree with David. I spent 3 years at Yale and found their attitude towards security and public safety a scandal. There's an infamous intersection next to the "Air Rights" parking garage which is notoriously dangerous to cross. Despite numerous complaints, Yale did nothing. Even after a med student was struck and killed, Yale did nothing. Yale is very good at saying how sorry they are for the bad things that happen there, but that's where it ends. They don't spend any money to improve student or staff safety because they simply don't care - people will continue to come to Yale because it's Yale.

So much for all that talk about respect for human dignity and being a responsible public citizen.
9.14.2009 12:57pm
ShelbyC:

Well yes, if the original news item was about Ted Kennedy dying of cancer.


Well, here the OP simply said that the murder "reminded" DB of the lack of security at Yale, and used that to segway into an anecdote that suggested more security outside would be appropriate. It didn't say, or even imply, that more security outside would have prevented the current murder.
9.14.2009 12:59pm
pot meet kettle (mail):
Yale students have long paid the price for Yale's refusal to invest to build the community they are a part of. This has only changed in the past 5-7 years, but it will take a while before these changes make a material difference to Yale's surroundings.
9.14.2009 1:04pm
Oren:
As a current Brandeis student, my opinion* is that the school has fallen into abject paranoia in regard to security concerns. We spent untold sums on a fancy notification system, outdoor alarms, drills, tests, contact-information-drives and other boondoggles. For a school in financial trouble, this is money better spent on the core mission of education.

* Purely my own, blah blah blah, disclaimer. YMMV. Not necessarily the opinion of anyone else but me.
9.14.2009 1:08pm
Oren:

So much for all that talk about respect for human dignity and being a responsible public citizen.

So much for the assumption that college students have mastered the middle-school-level skill of crossing the street too.

Yale's (&seq) job is to provide education, not to be a miniature sovereign nation with its own basic services.
9.14.2009 1:10pm
George Lyon (mail):
Still another argument for Campus Carry but am sure Yale would rather suffer a score of Virginia Techs rather than allow CCW on campus
9.14.2009 1:11pm
DavidBernstein (mail):
fancy notification system, outdoor alarms, drills, tests, contact-information-drives and other boondoggles
Fortunately, we didn't have any of them, just a very visible campus security presence.
9.14.2009 1:18pm
Sarah (mail) (www):
Admittedly, this was in the 1990s, but it took one sophomore-year trip to New Haven to convince me that I didn't want to bother applying to Yale. Sixteen months later when I was in rural Ohio and applying to schools, all the worries that my friends had about safety in downtown Columbus seemed absurd thanks to that same trip. At least USC (the school I wanted to go to when I was in elementary school in California) has the ability to keep the scariness mostly off-campus.
9.14.2009 1:18pm
Nelson Lund (mail):
Showy displays of security forces can have their downside as well, as a lot of people found out when they relied on the SEC to protect them from Bernie Madoff. At least in that case, of course, the government permitted people to protect themselves from con artists like Madoff, while Yale presumably forbids its students to take effective precautions against murderers.
9.14.2009 1:33pm
DavidBernstein (mail):
Even today, a police booth outside YLS (they have something inside now) could cover monitor a couple of blocks of Wall Street as well as part of Prospect (?) street. An occasional foot patrol could cover even more ground. I don't remember any physical safety incidents in the dorm, but someone stole several computers from several dorm rooms at the beginning of my second year.
9.14.2009 1:39pm
Brett Marston:
I don't know, David. I was there in the late nineties, and security seemed pretty heavy to me, compared to other schools I had been (Davidson, and two in Germany). It's a question of your frame of reference. I was on Chapel street once and witnessed an assault over a stolen bicycle - someone hit one of the blue-light emergency buttons and police from Yale and New Haven were there within a minute, coming from at least four different directions. They got the guy. Of course, it helped that a crowd of folks on the street immediately surrounded him and kept him from leaving. The
9.14.2009 1:40pm
Seamus (mail):
As a current Brandeis student, my opinion* is that the school has fallen into abject paranoia in regard to security concerns.

Your opinion is a current Brandeis student? Wow, and I thought colleges in California were flaky.
9.14.2009 1:41pm
Bigmouth (mail) (www):
David, the Law School campus at Yale is all of one block. How much security were you expecting? In fact, stats and anecdotal evidence suggest New Haven is much safer than, say, Cambridge, MA. A friend of mine -- ironically, a grad of Yale College -- was brutally beaten with pipes right outside the law library at HLS. Yet I never saw any security officers stationed outside buildings at HLS.

Also, the area where Le's body was found is apparently VERY secure because they conduct animal research. My guess is that she was killed by someone who works for the University -- maybe even someone she knows.
9.14.2009 1:52pm
Soronel Haetir (mail):
U.S.C certainly had a highly visible campus police presence when I was there in the mid-late 90s. Of course, I suppose having riots just a few blocks away and evacuating the campus will put administrative types in that kind of mindset.
9.14.2009 1:58pm
Prosecutorial Indiscretion:
David, the Law School campus at Yale is all of one block. How much security were you expecting? In fact, stats and anecdotal evidence suggest New Haven is much safer than, say, Cambridge, MA. A friend of mine -- ironically, a grad of Yale College -- was brutally beaten with pipes right outside the law library at HLS. Yet I never saw any security officers stationed outside buildings at HLS.

It's easy to secure one block. There's not all that much area to cover. Securing HLS's relatively sprawling campus, on the other hand, involves substantially more effort. Over the years I saw many security offers patrolling the HLS campus at all hours of the day and night. It's unfortunate that they were not able to prevent your friend's beating, but in terms of presence and diligence I was always impressed with the security around the HLS campus.
9.14.2009 2:06pm
microtherion (mail):
So many posts already without anybody proposing that Students simply be allowed &requested to carry personal firearms? Has the VC gone soft?
9.14.2009 2:06pm
silvermine (mail) (www):
Wow. I went to JHU for grad school, and the downtown medical campus had a policeman in a box on every single corner. The school also provided a bus to and from there to the other campus. If you missed that bus, you just stayed inside with all the doctors and such (security always checked badges, too), because only a fool would leave the hospital after 11 pm at night.

I lived across the street from the other campus and they made sure to post every single time a student was attacked on/near campus to keep everyone on their toes (along with a picture of the suspect if they had one). I'm pretty sure they would provide a security escort if you needed it.

At the time, Baltimore had the highest murder rate per capita.
9.14.2009 2:09pm
emsl (mail):
As a Yale grad ('78) and now a GC who happens to have corporate security in his portfolio, I think I have some perspective. First, back then New Haven/University relations were much worse and the city was also worse. Nonetheless, other than walking to/from the railway station, I rarely felt particularly insecure. Having spent time in NYC and Boston, I recognized that university was in an urban context with all that implies. Second, putting security in place is actually very difficult. I understand why Mr. Bernstein focuses on the law school, but the Yale Police must consider a campus that is extensive, and criss-crossed by public streets that they cannot simply close off. In sum, I think the university does a creditable job -- certainly not perfect -- and that there is no reason to think that incremental security would have prevented this crime.
9.14.2009 2:26pm
Connecticut Yankee:
Helen2:

Connecticut's reputation as a wealthy and idyllic state is completely undeserved. (I think that the New Yorkers who spread this false information can't see beyond Greenwich.) The crime rate in our three largest cities -- New Haven, Hartford, and Bridgeport -- is higher than in such notoriously violent locations as Chicago, Philadelphia, Oakland, CA, and East St. Louis and is just slightly lower than in Washington DC and Camden, NJ.

It's not just Greenwich; a lot of the rest of the state is wealthy and idyllic. It's just the urban cores that are in sad shape. (And given the colonial-era town lines, the cities of New Haven, Bridgeport, and Hartford don't include all that much beyond those urban cores.)
9.14.2009 2:29pm
mf24 (mail):
I hear U. of Virginia is Cavalier too.
9.14.2009 3:05pm
Leo Marvin (mail):
It's been a while, but in my three years at Berkeley I don't remember seeing a campus cop. Of course I don't remember the law against perpetuities either, so YMMV.
9.14.2009 3:20pm
Brian G (mail) (www):
I think concerns about security anywhere in Connecticut are unfounded because they have the nanny state to protect them. After all, when the government is involved, everything is perfect. Just ask any Obama supporter.

And, what about the alleged murderer? If he killed her, what societal oppression caused him to do it? Any Yale law student or grad can tell you that it is always someone else's fault, and he shouldn't get more than a week or two in jail, as incarceration is bad for mental health, which is therefore unconstitutional. (Hey, you got your Constitution, and Yale lawyers have theirs)

As a side note, my wife and I were heartbroken to read about this murder, especially since yesterday was supposed to be her wedding day.
9.14.2009 3:21pm
fromp:

Yale's (&seq) job is to provide education

That's right. Yale shouldn't be at all concerned with the safety of its students or staff. If a students gets mugged or run over or raped, that's there fault. They deserve it if they're so dumb as to attend a school in such a dangerous neighborhood. It certainly isn't Yale's job to give a damn about their students.

yeah, Yale shouldn't in anyway try to exert it's powerful influence to ensure that the community surrounding the campus is safe for its inhabitants. Now, when it comes to 'building safe and sustainable communities' elsewhere- particularly oversees, well, that's Yale mission if they ever had one.
9.14.2009 3:24pm
NHGuy:
With due respect, this conversation is premature and, given that it is based on one's former student's anecdotal evidence and reminiscing, is singularly unhelpful.

Before posting such observations, Bernstein should have taken the time to pull up the stats and present the evidence: is New Haven less safe than comparable campuses? By what measure? What are the trends? As it stands, we get nothing more than no-value-added town-vs-gown grumbling.

In any event, if this is a Yale-on-Yale crime that took place inside the security perimeter of a building (see Cato the Elder's post), Bernstein's claims about the lack of security on the YLS block are even less relevant and less helpful.
9.14.2009 3:35pm
PeteP:
Why exactly does Yale have a duty to 'make you safe from all possible unforseen threats' greater than that of the government ( on a city street ), or Walmart in their parking lot ?
9.14.2009 3:56pm
Anon21:
Brian G:
As a side note, my wife and I were heartbroken to read about this murder, especially since yesterday was supposed to be her wedding day.

But cf.:

And, what about the alleged murderer? If he killed her, what societal oppression caused him to do it? Any Yale law student or grad can tell you that it is always someone else's fault, and he shouldn't get more than a week or two in jail, as incarceration is bad for mental health, which is therefore unconstitutional. (Hey, you got your Constitution, and Yale lawyers have theirs)

Brian G was so heartbroken by this tragic murder that he couldn't wait to dash over to his favorite blog and use it as a bludgeon against people with political and legal views which differ from his own. Truly, Brian G, you are a paragon of compassion.

(I would include the obligatory "Find me a Yale lawyer who has views that bear even a passing resemblance to your jejune caricature," but really, the two paragraphs that Brian G himself chose to place in immediate sequence speak for themselves, no?)
9.14.2009 4:07pm
JK:
Wow, Georgetown Law Center felt like the Green-Zone sometimes. Security was always visible, alert, and highly professional. I bet the line has to do with accepting the fact you're in a somewhat "bad" area. It's hard to criticize GULC for taking the approach that it did, but I could see Yale being accused of treating the locals as criminals or some such.
9.14.2009 4:30pm
BD (mail):
I'm sorry, am I on glue here or do people not pay for the school they go to? If you want more security, demand it from the school? Of course, that means they have to pay for it, which undoubtedly adds to the cost of tuition. If students care about having "adequate" security, they can always demand it and offer then to pay for it. Since they are presumably the people who benefit from such a service.
9.14.2009 5:24pm
karrde (mail) (www):
I have zero experience with being a student at Ivy-League Universities (or Law Schools of any caliber).

I did do a stint as Security Aide at a State-run university of ~6000 students in the Great Lakes region. My job was to walk the campus two evenings a week, report any nefarious deeds I saw, and open/close classrooms which had been reserved by student groups.

Security reported 5-7 incidents (usually petty theft, with a sprinkling of Minor In Possession of alcohol) per week to the campus newspaper. I never saw or reported any of these kinds of events.

The University was located in a small town which was also county seat; I suspect that the total LEO count (County Sheriff, City Police, and Campus Security) rarely exceeded 15 on-duty, with a similar number off-duty.

Neither Police nor Campus Security made their presence intrusive, but they did make themselves seen. Campus Security had call-boxes located throughout campus.

My thoughts are that the city that the University is in (and Law Enforcement in surrounding areas) has a larger impact on campus safety than the actions of Campus Security. I also suspect that murders like the one revealed at Yale are nearly-impossible for Security to prevent. This has the appearance of an inside job, someone among the pool of the Trusted who shouldn't have been trusted.

Such cases can be cracked; they are hard events to deter through Security Presence.
9.14.2009 5:34pm
Oren:


It's not just Greenwich; a lot of the rest of the state is wealthy and idyllic. It's just the urban cores that are in sad shape. (And given the colonial-era town lines, the cities of New Haven, Bridgeport, and Hartford don't include all that much beyond those urban cores.)


Those two facts are intimately related, as the colonial-era town lines give leave those urban cores with no suburban tax base.
9.14.2009 6:31pm
Can't Help It in AZ:
Maybe Yale should look into banning casks of amontillado?

This is a terrible thing but it doesn't seem clear they could have done anything about it with additional security and as a general rule I'm opposed to expecting everwhere to constantly be locked down. More info will develop and maybe more will become clear, but despite the futility of asking this of lawyers on a law blog, lets back away from the temptation to leap at any concievable change just because something bad happened.
9.14.2009 6:52pm
ChrisTS (mail):
NHGuy:

With due respect, this conversation is premature and, given that it is based on one's former student's anecdotal evidence and reminiscing, is singularly unhelpful.


THANK YOU.
9.14.2009 7:15pm
Hungry Hippo:
Couldn't students just hire their own security through some voluntary system, rather than charging all students for security that only a few nervous nellies need?
9.14.2009 7:48pm
Joshua Treman (mail):
Why can I comment on this but I can't comment on Mr. Bernstein's good ole Nazi scalp hunting expedition across the interwebs?
9.14.2009 8:23pm
neurodoc:
Commentor: Any statistics regarding crime on campus or numbers of security guards / police to go with those anecdotes?
Didn't Congress enact legislation years ago that required colleges to report their crime statistics? And haven't a number of schools been less than candid with those crime stats, which can have an unsettling effect on parents?

silvermine, Both of Hopkins campuses, the Homewood and medical complex ones, have had students murdered close by, the former a few years ago, the latter a good number of years back. Years ago, interns and residents, who effectively had no time off, used to live with their families across from the hospital in what was known as the "Compound," surrounded by barb wire. Over the years, along with a great deal of building, security around the medical center has increased greatly.

Hopkins security didn't protect me from having a car stolen a few years ago or another car stripped, both in broad daylight, but I was parked across Orleans in front of the projects, beyond the security perimeter. The areas around the medical center, which the school keeps pushing back with its development, demand a high level of security.
9.14.2009 8:50pm
ReaderY:

NHGuy:


With due respect, this conversation is premature and, given that it is based on one's former student's anecdotal evidence and reminiscing, is singularly unhelpful.


THANK YOU.


It appears not knowing facts is no obstacle to having opinions.
9.14.2009 9:10pm
anon522 (mail):
Wow, Georgetown Law Center felt like the Green-Zone sometimes. Security was always visible, alert, and highly professional. I bet the line has to do with accepting the fact you're in a somewhat "bad" area. It's hard to criticize GULC for taking the approach that it did, but I could see Yale being accused of treating the locals as criminals or some such.
Except that at least in the late 90s, when I had a friend then, students were routinely getting mugged in the morning between Union Station and the law school. They asked for a security guard to be available to walk students between the school and the station in the morning, to no avail.
9.14.2009 9:56pm
Pauldom:

U.S.C certainly had a highly visible campus police presence when I was there in the mid-late 90s. Of course, I suppose having riots just a few blocks away and evacuating the campus will put administrative types in that kind of mindset.

SC was like that in the 80s too, when I started grad school. (The riots happened when I was scheduled to take my oral exams, making me the only one in L.A. who was fretting about how I could get *onto* campus safely. At least, I fretted until I was reminded that my faculty wouldn't be there to give the test.)
9.14.2009 10:05pm
Duffy Pratt (mail):
As an undergrad in the late 70s, security was basically non-existent. Before 10 pm, anyone could get into any of the residential colleges. And outside of the main gate at the old campus, I don't think I ever saw campus police. The city was much more dangerous, having the highest violent crime rate for any small city in the country (with the possible exception of Bridgeport.)

I went to Columbia in the early 80s. It had even less visible security, and probably was more dangerous overall. Perhaps not on campus, but all you had to do was walk a block in the wrong direction and you could be in some pretty deep shit.

I returned to Yale in the late 80s (same class as David's), and the security overall was much tighter than it had been earlier. I suppose it was still pretty thin, but the city was much much safer at that time. The main danger point near the Law School was the parking street behind the cemetary. That road wasn't very safe. But overall, the entire city was much safer than it had been. And I do recall seeing some beat patrols while I was at law school, mostly in the cross campus area, and sometimes on Elm street. But that was an enormous presence compared to when I was an undergrad.

The talk of security may or may not have anything to do with the recent murder there. When I was an undergrad, the big security stink came with the Jodie Foster/Hinckley/Reagan incident. There was absolutely nothing that security could have done about that either, but it didn't stop people from making alot of noise.
9.14.2009 10:13pm
Duncan Frissell (mail):
I think it's sad that people feel they have to depend on armed guards for security. Security was unnecessary 60 years ago because we spanked children and executed murders.

Why not substitute those techniques. They worked. Saved money too.

If you can't change others minds to reduce crime at the source, just pack and reduce it at the other end. Women who carry illegally are largely exempt from punishment BTW.
9.14.2009 10:24pm
ChrisTS (mail):
Joshua Treman:
Why can I comment on this but I can't comment on Mr. Bernstein's good ole Nazi scalp hunting expedition across the interwebs?

Indeed.
9.14.2009 10:29pm
AJK:

Couldn't students just hire their own security through some voluntary system, rather than charging all students for security that only a few nervous nellies need?


I think you might run into some free-rider problems!
9.14.2009 10:37pm
AJK:

I think it's sad that people feel they have to depend on armed guards for security. Security was unnecessary 60 years ago because we spanked children and executed murders.


The homicide rate in 1949 was 5.4 per 100,000. In 2008, it was 5.8 per 100,000.
9.14.2009 10:45pm
Jeff Walden (www):
In fact, stats and anecdotal evidence suggest New Haven is much safer than, say, Cambridge, MA. A friend of mine -- ironically, a grad of Yale College -- was brutally beaten with pipes right outside the law library at HLS. Yet I never saw any security officers stationed outside buildings at HLS.


Hm, my experience disagrees with yours, although I wasn't at that little liberal arts school up the street in Cambridge. :-P Campus police at MIT were present and moderately but not overbearingly visible -- except for when you were exploring the campus after hours, when they could on occasion be around more than one would ordinarily want. The blue emergency buttons were well-scattered, too, so that it generally wasn't more than a couple hundred feet or so to one from outside. There was still occasional violence, but it was usually off-campus and didn't involve any MIT affiliates.
9.15.2009 12:10am
Cato The Elder (mail) (www):

Why can I comment on this but I can't comment on Mr. Bernstein's good ole Nazi scalp hunting expedition across the interwebs?

Indeed.

Joshua Treman, ChrisTS,

You know very well why. Many of your fellow partisans aren't responsible enough to conduct themselves well in Bernstein's threads. There's a palpable rush to "crush" the thread and utterly suppress dissent in a flood of ad hominems and general "nitty-ness". Instead of typing one thoughtful, condensed post, they'll type five. Instead of attacking Bernstein's posts on their merits, they'll attack him as a "hack" or a "shill" for Israeli interests. The thing is I can't come up with a hard-and-fast rule that makes their conduct wrong, as one can always find a counter-example of another successful VC thread that seems contradictory. But I know it when I see it; others can attest to it too, and many realize that that sort of behavior requires strict policing from a moderator to keep the thread from getting totally out of line.

Keep in mind I rarely get exercised about issues pertaining to Israel. In fact I don't think we have enough information to completely indict Garlasco as of yet. But do I look forward to reading some others' opinions agreeing with me? Heck no.
9.15.2009 12:14am
Phili (mail):
As penance for this murder, Yale should not racially discriminate against 10-15 Asian-American students in admissions next cycle.
9.15.2009 8:07am
Eli Rabett (www):
There was a rather long discussion of campus security here together with an Ayn Rand beach story
9.15.2009 10:37am
Paul A'Barge (mail):
Apparently she was whacked by a spurned lover-wanna-be who worked in the same building.

So much for security.

People have to be responsible for their own security. Instead of demanding lots of police driving around a campus you really should be promoting the concealed carry of handguns by students on campus and the training by a university or college of students in how to use guns and how to defend oneself.
9.15.2009 10:39am
Dan Weber (www):
As a freshman at MIT, I remember being explicitly told by the college "it is not our job to keep you safe." It was probably the most important thing they could have done. You live in an urban area, stop expecting to be protected in every thing you do.
9.15.2009 12:12pm
Matthew Carberry (mail):
At least at MIT the Uni isn't being two-faced in that statement by acknowledging that they aren't any safer than the city they are in, yet still insisting upon different rules for the adults who choose to attend than they have in said city.
9.15.2009 3:15pm
Brad Ford:
While I was at Yale, it seemed like a student was robbed trying to get money from an ATM almost every week. There was a running gun battle near SOM and the science building, Ms. Jovin was murdered and a jogger was the victim of a savage sexual assault in East Rock. Crime in New Haven is everywhere.

Sadly, in addition to having a small force relative to the crime in New Haven, the NHPD and the Yale Police have proven inept. In the process of failing to solve the Jovin murder, they managed to ruin the career of a lecturer by publically naming, without any evidence, him as the prime suspect.
9.15.2009 4:01pm
ChrisTS (mail):
Cato the Elder:

Thank you for explaining Prof. Bernstein's choice of posts to open to comments. I thought it might be that he is always away on those days.

By the way, I have no independent interest in HRW or the man Prof. B has been attacking. I do have an interest in logic, reasoning, intlellectual honesty, and fairness. I found his posts on Garlasco to be largely absent all of those.
9.15.2009 6:21pm
Leo Marvin (mail):
I assume DB forgot this thread is open, since at the end of his last Garlasco post he said:

I've had several requests to open comments to one of these HRW posts, but unfortunately I'll be unavailable for moderating over the next two days, and I just don't do unmoderated comments.

It's his blog so he's entitled to open and close comments as he sees fit. Readers will draw their own conclusions about the significance of those decisions. Some of those conclusions will no doubt be more reasonable than others.

The only such decision that strikes me as especially questionable is closing the Kampeas/Greenwald/Podhoretz thread when he did. Greenwald responded to DB's post with a comment on the thread. DB replied, and then minutes later closed the thread to further comments.

Maybe Greenwald had no interest in continuing the exchange. Maybe David intends to pick it up again in another thread when he's available to moderate comments. But without some kind of explanation, closing the thread when he did creates the appearance he may have cut it off to avoid continuing the exchange with Greenwald.
9.15.2009 7:40pm
ChrisTS (mail):
Leo Marvin:

Thanks for picking up on the 'no unmoderated comments' lapse.
9.15.2009 10:13pm

Post as: [Register] [Log In]

Account:
Password:
Remember info?

If you have a comment about spelling, typos, or format errors, please e-mail the poster directly rather than posting a comment.

Comment Policy: We reserve the right to edit or delete comments, and in extreme cases to ban commenters, at our discretion. Comments must be relevant and civil (and, especially, free of name-calling). We think of comment threads like dinner parties at our homes. If you make the party unpleasant for us or for others, we'd rather you went elsewhere. We're happy to see a wide range of viewpoints, but we want all of them to be expressed as politely as possible.

We realize that such a comment policy can never be evenly enforced, because we can't possibly monitor every comment equally well. Hundreds of comments are posted every day here, and we don't read them all. Those we read, we read with different degrees of attention, and in different moods. We try to be fair, but we make no promises.

And remember, it's a big Internet. If you think we were mistaken in removing your post (or, in extreme cases, in removing you) -- or if you prefer a more free-for-all approach -- there are surely plenty of ways you can still get your views out.